CORN FLAKES WITH JOHN LENNON by Robert Hilburn [Review]

Corn Flakes With John Lennon

Corn Flakes With John Lennon is the first book by Robert Hilburn, former rock critic for the LA Times. After a nice introduction by U2’s Bono, Hilburn narrates his way through his amazing career as one of the best rock critics of our time. Hilburn does an excellent job of peppering in details of his own life and love for music with his experiences interviewing rock stars. You’ll learn about his late-night hangouts with John Lennon during his famous ‘Lost Weekend’ phase, watching cartoons with Michael Jackson, his visit to Folsom Prison with Johnny Cash, and much, much more.

There are many books in this genre out there, but to me, Corn Flakes With John Lennon has nailed it. This book gives you a true sense of what these rock stars were like behind the scenes, without it feeling contrived. Hilburn, who claims to drink nothing stronger than diet coke, may have been the only person sober enough in the 70s to relate any reliable information on these topics. Thank god for that. Some of the bands and artists that are talked about the most are: U2, Elvis, John Lennon, Springsteen, Bob Dylan, Waylon Jennings, and Johnny Cash. These are some of my favorite artists of all time, so for me, this book was pure heaven. I’m giving Corn Flakes With John Lennon a 5 out of 5 because it’s honestly the best book in this genre that I’ve ever read.
If you don’t want to take my word for it, read some quotes from what some others have said about the book:

So many great memories came flooding back to me when I read Corn Flakes With John Lennon. A must read for genuine music lovers. –Elton John

On behalf of the musicians of the 60’s on, I thank you for having been the communicator of our music with love.–yoko ono

I never gave a damn for rock criticism until I read Robert Hilburn. –Bernie Taupin

Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars | Publisher: Rodale Books | Pages: 296 | Buy on Amazon

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  • David

    What a book and what a life this guy has led. You are right he down plays his role quite a bit, making the artist the center of the story and not himself. you get a real sense for what these people were like back when music meant something other than a quick buck!

    Great recommendation Amie and a great read!